img_ABQ-demand-for-large-office-spaces-is-strong-CBRE-report-says---Albuquerque-Business-First

NM tops nation in wind-energy growth

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — New Mexico ranked as the nation’s fastest-growing state for wind-energy construction last year, according to a new report from the American Wind Energy Association.

The state added enough new turbines to produce 571 megawatts of electricity, growing installed capacity by 51 percent to 1.68 gigawatts, according to the association’s 2017 annual market report, released this morning in Santa Fe. That’s enough electricity to power about 422,000 average U.S. homes every year.

And New Mexico could maintain front-running status for another couple of years, with 1.7 GW of new wind construction projects now in the pipelines for installation through 2020, said association spokesman Evan Vaughn.

“New Mexico is poised to double its wind generation in the near term,” Vaughn told the Journal’s editorial board on Monday. “It had the fastest growth rate of any state in the nation in 2017. There’s tremendous momentum underway.”

The Washington, D.C.-based association chooses a different state each year to unveil its annual report. It released this year’s study in a press conference at the Roundhouse to honor the state for its leadership in wind generation.

Nationwide, installed capacity grew by nearly 9 percent last year to nearly 89 GW. That’s enough electricity to power about 27 million homes, representing about 6.3 percent of the country’s total generating capacity.

New Mexico now derives about 13.5 percent of its electricity from wind energy. It’s one of only 14 states where wind turbines provide more than 10 percent of total generation, although some states use much more, with up to 30 percent in Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, and South Dakota.

The association reports about $145 billion in wind energy investments nationwide over the last decade, including $11 billion last year. About 105,000 people now work in the industry, including 23,000 in manufacturing.

New Mexico has attracted about $3 billion in investments to date, with more than 3,000 people employed here.

“Employment runs the full gamut, from front-end field workers who assess wind resources and work with local communities to construction jobs and long-term employment for operations and maintenance folks,” said John Hensley, association director for research and analytics. “Wind technicians make up one of the two fastest-growing jobs nationwide alongside solar installers.”

It particularly benefits rural communities, which absorb about 99 percent of investment, Hensley said. It also generates substantial local and state taxes, plus income for land owners.

In New Mexico, property owners now earn between $5 million and $10 million annually, said Interwest Energy Alliance Executive Director Sarah Cottrell Propst.

“It’s an economic development tool that helps to diversify the economy with competitive, high-paying jobs,” she said.

It’s also good for the environment, offsetting 189 million metric tons of carbon emissions last year, or the equivalent of 40 million cars. In New Mexico, it offset about 466,000 metric tons, or about 99,000 cars.

Source Article

img_ABQ-demand-for-large-office-spaces-is-strong-CBRE-report-says---Albuquerque-Business-First

The Latest: Albuquerque immigrant measure goes to mayor

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The Latest on an Albuquerque City Council vote on a measure supporting immigrant-friendly policies (all times local):

10:20 p.m.

The Albuquerque City Council has approved a measure that would prevent federal immigration officers from entering a prisoner transport center without a warrant, and prohibit local tax dollars from being used to enforce federal immigration laws.

The measure debated Monday seeks to bolster the New Mexico city’s “immigrant friendly” status — which briefly came under scrutiny within the Trump administration last year as the Justice Department sought to pressure cities into cooperating with federal immigration authorities.

The Albuquerque measure would also bar city workers, including police, from collecting information on peoples’ immigration status.

It must go before Mayor Tim Keller for final approval before coming law.

The vote comes after a federal judge last week issued a nationwide injunction barring the U.S. Justice Department from giving priority status for policing grants to departments that agree to cooperate with immigration officials.

3:40 p.m.

The Albuquerque City Council plans to vote on a measure Monday evening that would prevent federal immigration officers from entering a prisoner transport center without a warrant, and prohibit local tax dollars from being used to enforce federal immigration laws.

The measure seeks to bolster the New Mexico city’s “immigrant friendly” status — which briefly came under scrutiny within the Trump administration last year as the Justice Department sought to pressure cities into cooperating with federal immigration authorities.

The Albuquerque measure would also bar city workers, including police, from collecting information on peoples’ immigration status.

The vote comes after a federal judge last week issued a nationwide injunction barring the U.S. Justice Department from giving priority status for policing grants to departments that agree to cooperate with immigration officials.

Source Article

img_What-your-favorite-TV-characters-would-actually-pay-in-rent-for-their-apartments-in-the-real-world

What your favorite TV characters would actually pay in rent for their apartments in the real world

Sheldon and Leonard’s apartment probably costs about $2,272.
Television shows often give unrealistic expectations of how much it actually costs to afford an apartment in a big city. Carrie Bradshaw likely could not have afforded her living space on the Upper East Side on her writer’s salary.The friends on "New Girl" could very well afford their Los Angeles-based apartment in real life.

Have you ever watched one of your favorite shows and pondered how a character could afford their giant city apartment on a small salary? Us too. So we decided to do a bit of investigative work to see what the TV homes we see on screen would actually cost.

We teamed up with the data experts at Trulia to analyze layout and neighborhoods to determine the modern day costs of each space. Big surprise? Most of the homes have some pretty hefty price tags and the apartments have crazy high rent. Read ahead to see the IRL costs of some famous on-screen abodes.

Even though Marnie’s studio in "Girls" is laughably small (especially once her husband Desi tries building a wall), the spot in NYC’s Chinatown probably still costs a whopping $2,575 a month.

For someone who struggles financially, Hannah has definitely benefitted from splitting rent in her two-bedroom apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Trulia estimates that the rent might have been $2,500 per month.

With a home value of $3,023,753, it makes sense why six people are needed to pay rent for the Palo Alto incubator house owned by Erlich Bachmann.

We totally dug the open layout of Dev’s studio apartment in "Master Of None." However, we wouldn’t want to spend $2,561 per month to live in the Williamsburg pad totally solo.

Hopefully superhero Jessica Jones is making quite a bit of money as a private eye. Her Hell’s Kitchen pre-war apartment most likely costs $3,250. However, since Jessica Jones lives in the Marvel universe, average prices might be a bit different.

While the meth lab probably would have lowered the price even further, Walter White’s three-bedroom home in Albuquerque, New Mexico likely cost $187,788.

While Titus and Kimmy always chat about how cheap their one-bedroom basement apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn is, the rent is actually probably $2,400 per month.

The home of the Dunphy family is located in LA’s Cheviot Hills. With a great yard and neighborhood, the two-story four-bedroom home most likely costs around $3.26 million.

People have argued for years that Carrie probably couldn’t afford her Upper East Side apartment with that killer closet on a writer’s salary. Well if she still lived there today as a single thirty-something, the same would be true. Her spot most likely costs $3,000 per month.

Although Stars Hollow isn’t a real Connecticut town, Trulia was able to estimate that the stars’ two-bedroom home would cost around $445,000.

Abbi shares her apartment in Astoria, Queens with her always-absent roommate’s boyfriend Bevers. Total rent for the two-bedroom is most likely $2,200 per month.

Sign up here to get INSIDER’s favorite stories straight to your inbox.

Source Article

img_Texas-officials-may-elevate-200-flood-prone-homes

Texas officials may elevate 200 flood-prone homes

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) – Preliminary estimates indicate that a hurricane recovery program in southeast Texas could elevate as many as 200 homes that have been repeatedly flooded.

The Daily News reports that Galveston County commissioners received details about the plan Monday from Grantworks, consultants hired to facilitate disaster recovery planning.

Galveston County Judge Mark Henry says commissioners must next notify the Texas Department of Emergency Management about interest in funds to create the program.

The department plans to release $500 million in hazardous mitigation funds across Texas. Galveston County officials expect to receive a large portion of those funds to raise homes flooded by Hurricane Harvey, though efforts would focus on structures that have flooded multiple times.

Henry says the program would likely require homeowners to help cover part of the project’s cost.

Information from: The Galveston County Daily News, http://www.galvnews.com

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source Article